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Partition

The Transfer of Jodhpur Railways, 1947–48: Denials, Delays and Divisions

Author(s): 
Rakesh Ankit
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2017/40/special-articles/transfer-jodhpur-railways-1947%E2%80%9348.html

The process of partition between India and Pakistan, that is, dividing up material assets, remains an under-written subject, barring its border-building aspects. While the old scholarship offered an adversarial account of this exercise, the recent attempts revise this narrative by stressing upon the cooperation evinced by the two sides. Where the former found antagonism, the latter has sought to locate some mutually agreed method in the madness.

Bureaucracy and Border Control: Crime, Police Reform and National Security in Kutch, 1948–52

Author(s): 
Farhana Ibrahim
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2017/15/exploring-borderlands-south-asia/bureaucracy-and-border-control.html

Studies on militarisation and borders in South Asia have often remained focused on zones of spectacular conflict such as Kashmir, or Punjab during the partition. This article tracks the production of a discourse on borders by those charged with border security such as the police and other senior bureaucracy in the decades following the partition.

End of the Postcolonial State

Author(s): 
Faisal Devji
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2021/44/50-years-liberation-bangladesh/end-postcolonial-state.html

Much of the scholarship on Bangladesh’s founding places it within a narrative of repetition. It either repeats the partitions of 1905 or 1947 or the creation of India and Pakistan as postcolonial states. This paper argues instead for the novelty of Bangladesh’s creation against the postcolonial state, suggesting that it opened up a new history at the global level in which decolonisation was replaced by civil war as the founding narrative for new states.

Misreading Partition Road Signs

Author(s): 
Hamza Alavi
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2002/44-45/special-articles/misreading-partition-road-signs.html

History does not retrace its steps. It is no longer useful to ask if the partition could have been avoided. The question is no longer important. The different perceptions of the shared history of India and Pakistan have, perhaps, contributed in some measure to create barriers of prejudice between the two nations. However, there are issues of history that need to be looked at again. This article attempts to highlight some of those contentious and often ill-understood issues. Offered here is an attempt by a sociologist-cum-social anthropologist to highlight some issues.

Forgetting Partition: Constitutional Amnesia and Nationalism

Author(s): 
Kanika Gauba
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2016/39/special-articles/forgetting-partition.html

History’s silence resonates in the textual silence of the Indian Constitution on the immense scale of violence and exodus accompanying the partition of the subcontinent, despite the contemporaneity of partition and constitution writing. Clearly discernible on a closer reading of the Constituent Assembly's debates are implicit influences of partition on key constitutional decisions, such as citizenship, political safeguards for religious minorities and provisions creating a strong central tendency in the union.

India, Pakistan, and a History of Water Sharing: Revisiting the Indus Water Treaty

Author(s): 
EPW Engage
Publisher/Sponsor: 
EPW Engage
www.epw.in/engage/article/india-pakistan-indus-water-treaty

Legal and political considerations make flouting the Indus Water Treaty easier said than done.

Iqbal, Jinnah and India's Partition: An Intimate Relationship

Author(s): 
V.N. Datta
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2002/50/special-articles/iqbal-jinnah-and-indias-partition.html

This paper brings out some dimensions of the crucial political relationship between Muhammad Iqbal and Mohammad Ali Jinnah. Though this relationship had far-reaching consequences in shaping the contours of the subcontinent's turbulent history, it has not been adequately studied in partition histories.

‘A certain terror’: corporeality and religion in narratives of the 1947 India/Pakistan partition

Author(s): 
Anindya Raychaudhuri
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Oral History Forum d'historie Oral
www.oralhistoryforum.ca/index.php/ohf/article/view/647

This article will take as its case study the 1947 India/Pakistan partition, and is based on a large oral history project, which took place over the last five years. In this article, I focus on selected excerpts from some of my interviews, examining the ways in which people describe religious belief, practice, prejudice and violence as corporeal experiences, with markers of religiosity often inscribed on the body. I examine how the corporeality of religious violence was not an aberration from everyday religious practices, but in effect an extension of religion as an embodied entity.

Postcolonial Parabola: Literature, Tactility, and the Ethics of Representing Trauma

Jay Rajiva
Bloomsbury Academic
2017

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